“scientists cure type 1 diabetes -prediabetes detox diet for seniors”

If you have diabetes or prediabetes, your doctor will likely recommend that you see a dietitian to help you develop a healthy eating plan. The plan helps you control your blood sugar (glucose), manage your weight and control risk factors for heart disease, such as high blood pressure and high blood fats.

Calcium-D Glucarate: converts to glucaric acid in your body, supporting a crucial detoxification pathway in your liver. Glucaric acid scavenges your body to bind and eliminate unavoidable toxins that would otherwise wreak havoc on your health and performance.

One gram of protein provides 4 calories. Protein is commonly recommended as part of a bedtime snack to maintain normal blood sugar levels during the night, although studies are mixed over whether it adds any protective benefits against nighttime hypoglycemia. If it does, only small amounts (14 grams) may be needed to stabilize blood glucose levels.

Avoid alcoholic drinks (such as wine, beer, and spirits) during the cleanse. Alcohol is metabolized in the body mainly by the liver. It is broken down briefly to acetaldehyde, a chemical that has the potential to damage liver cells and body tissues, before it is further broken down and eliminated from the body. Besides lightening the load on your liver, avoiding alcohol (and caffeine) for the week can help to shift habits you’ve cultivated.

Potassium and Phosphorus. Potassium-rich foods, and potassium supplements, can help lower systolic and diastolic blood pressure. Current guidelines encourage enough dietary potassium to achieve 3,500 mg per day for people with normal or high blood pressure (except those who have risk factors for excess potassium http://drhyman.com/blog/2014/03/06/top-10-big-ideas-detox-sugar/ including kidney disease and the use of certain medications). This goal is particularly important in people who have high sodium intake.

Broccoli is a member of the cruciferous vegetable family, which includes other veggies such as Brussels sprouts, cabbage, cauliflower, and bok choy. What makes this class of veggies unique is the high levels of sulfur-containing compounds known as glucosinolates. Perhaps better known for their potential anticancer effects, these compounds may also have a role in reducing heart disease risk and heart-related deaths. In a study reported in The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition in 2011, researchers found that cruciferous vegetable consumption was associated with a reduced risk of death from heart disease. Their recommendation: “Increase consumption of vegetables, particularly cruciferous vegetables and fruit, to promote cardiovascular healthy and overall longevity.”

Diabetes is an illness related to elevated blood sugar levels. When you stop releasing and responding to normal amounts of insulin after eating foods with carbohydrates, sugar and fats, you have diabetes. Insulin, a hormone that’s broken down and transported to cells to be used as energy, is released by the pancreas to help with the storage of sugar and fats. But people with diabetes don’t respond to insulin properly, which causes high blood sugar levels and diabetes symptoms.

Diets high in fat, especially saturated fat, worsen glucose tolerance and increase the risk of type 2 diabetes.  Saturated fat is found primarily in meat, dairy fat and the dark meat and skins of poultry. In contrast, glucose intolerance has been improved by diets high in monounsaturated oils. The best way to incorporate mono-unsaturates into the diet is to use extra virgin olive oil and flaxseed oil which have high antioxidant values.

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, accounting for 90 – 95% of cases. In type 2 diabetes, the body does not respond normally to insulin, a condition known as insulin resistance. Over time, some patients also run out of insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the initial effect is usually an abnormal rise in blood sugar right after a meal (called postprandial hyperglycemia).

Supplementing with psyllium has been shown to be a safe and well-tolerated way to improve control of blood glucose and cholesterol. In a double-blind trial, men with type 2 diabetes who took 5.1 grams of psyllium per day for eight weeks lowered their blood glucose levels by 11 to 19.2%, their total cholesterol by 8.9%, and their LDL (bad) cholesterol by 13%, compared with a placebo. (18) 

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